From: St Osmunds
After a difficult year for Britain, with so much news coverage devoted to Brexit, it was a nice relief to see some positive news in the form of the birth of Baby Sussex (who's now known as Archie). He is the son of Prince Harry and his wife Meghan, and was born at 5:26 on the 6th May in London's Portland Hospital. His full name is Archie Harrison Mountbatten - Windsor. The couple shared the news on Instagram with an image of Queen Elizabeth and Megan's mother Doria Ragland, meeting their newest great - grandson. BBC royal correspondent Jonny Dymond said there was a "strong indication" that Archie won't be brought up as a formal 'royal'. Harry and Meghan Markle have made it very clear  that they plan to break tradition and raise their son away from the spotlight, so as to give him the most ‘normal’ upbringing possible, possibly even in South Africa, where Harry's uncle, the Earl of Spencer, lives.  
UK
From: St Osmunds
After a difficult year for Britain, with so much news coverage devoted to Brexit, it was a nice relief to see some positive news in the form of the birth of Baby Sussex (who's now known as Archie). He is the son of Prince Harry and his wife Meghan, and was born at 5:26 on the 6th May in London's Portland Hospital. His full name is Archie Harrison Mountbatten - Windsor. The couple shared the news on Instagram with an image of Queen Elizabeth and Megan's mother Doria Ragland, meeting their newest great - grandson. BBC royal correspondent Jonny Dymond said there was a "strong indication" that Archie won't be brought up as a formal 'royal'. Harry and Meghan Markle have made it very clear  that they plan to break tradition and raise their son away from the spotlight, so as to give him the most ‘normal’ upbringing possible, possibly even in South Africa, where Harry's uncle, the Earl of Spencer, lives.  
From: St Osmunds
What do Selena Gomez and the Queen have in common? They now both post on Instagram! Queen Elizabeth II posted her first ever Instagram photo of the royal family on the official "Royal Family Instagram Account" for which she used an iPad as she examined "Top Secret exhibits" in the Science Museum. Members of Newsnuggets along with Barnes Primary, were fortunate enough to experience the arrival of Her Majesty in a black Range Rover at the main entrance of the Science Museum. Some were even able to learn about computer coding tequniqhes while interacting with the Queen. After this, Her Majesty said: "Today, I had the pleasure of learning about children's computer coding initiatives and it seems fitting to me that I publish this Instagram post at the Science Museum, which has long championed technology, innovation and inspired the next generation of inventors." During this, other members of Newsnuggets were interviewed by Sky News and First News. The Queen's post was inspired after reading a letter written in 1843 to Queen Elizabeth's great - great grandfather, Prince Albert, from computer pioneer: Charles Babbage. Over 170 years later, the invention that Babbage developed enabled Her Majesty to communicate with all her subjects "Instantly." Image Credit : Getty Images. Author Thalia is in the background looking on.
From: St Osmunds
On Wednesday 27th February, almost a month to the day from the UK's scheduled departure from the European Union (Brexit), our Newsnuggets' Club at St Osmund's Primary School in Barnes, South West London took to the streets. We conducted a very small, anonymous poll (we only had 30 minutes) in order to find out what the general public thought about their options on whether or how to leave the EU, today. This coincided with the Labour Party's pledge that it was prepared to back another EU referendum to prevent a "damaging Tory Brexit". Barnes is part of the Borough of Richmond, which backed the Remain Campaign by 65%. We interviewed a total of 12 people, across all demographics. In bold are the 3 questions we asked and the yes/no percentage of their answers. Did you vote Leave or Remain in the 2016 Referedum? Leave : 25% Remain : 75 % Do you think we should leave the EU with No Deal? Yes, just get on with it: 20% No : it would be very damaging for the economy: 70% Not sure : 10% Knowing what you know 2 years on, would you want a second Referendum? Yes: 70 % No, we must get on with it : 30% It was fascinating to see that some of those who voted to Leave in 2016 would now welcome a second referendum. It was also interesting that some who voted to Remain, don't want any further delay and just want to government to reach a deal and get on with their promise. On a national level, the survey by polling firm YouGov conducted that same week showed that if a referendum were held immediately, 46 percent would vote to remain, 39 percent would vote to leave, and the rest either did not know, would not vote, or refused to answer the question.   By : The St Osmund's Team