Featured
From: St Osmunds
After a difficult year for Britain, with so much news coverage devoted to Brexit, it was a nice relief to see some positive news in the form of the birth of Baby Sussex (who's now known as Archie). He is the son of Prince Harry and his wife Meghan, and was born at 5:26 on the 6th May in London's Portland Hospital. His full name is Archie Harrison Mountbatten - Windsor. The couple shared the news on Instagram with an image of Queen Elizabeth and Megan's mother Doria Ragland, meeting their newest great - grandson. BBC royal correspondent Jonny Dymond said there was a "strong indication" that Archie won't be brought up as a formal 'royal'. Harry and Meghan Markle have made it very clear  that they plan to break tradition and raise their son away from the spotlight, so as to give him the most ‘normal’ upbringing possible, possibly even in South Africa, where Harry's uncle, the Earl of Spencer, lives.  
From: Barnes
Down in the sewers of Denmark a medieval sword has been dug out from the sewer's mud. The sword was from the 1300s and still seems to be awfully sharp and in super condition. The sword was covered in human waste and no one is really sure how it got there. Archaeologists think that the sword belonged to a magnificent warrior, from the 1300s. At the time, the swords were really expensive so only people from a royal family could afford to have one. It is going to be displayed in the Nordjyllands history museum in Aalborg, Denmark. The sword weighed about 2 pounds, and the sword was pushed and shoved so deeply in the sewers' mud that it was not noticed till now.  
From: Barnes
On the twenty fourth of April, Some Voices performed at the Clapham Grand. Some Voices were called 'London's coolest choir' when they performed BBC Radio Two's Friday Night is Music Night. The theme of the concert was Hollywood classics so they sung songs from numerous films including The Greatest Showman and Trainspotting. There are over 400 singers, amateur and professional, in the group.  They have sung loads of songs from Queen to Tina Turner and have always had brilliant costumes to match. Oh and my dad is one of the singers!
From: St Osmunds
Every year we celebrate an International Day of Women and Girls in Science. This day, which falls on the 11th February, is a reminder that women and girls play a critical role in science and that their contribution needs to be celebrated. Here are a few women from the present and the past who have well and truly left their mark in the world of science. Alice Ball Long ago, there was no cure for leprosy, a disease that attacks the body and can leave victims terribly disfigured. Because there was no treatment and people believed leprosy was very contagious, sufferers used to isolated in leper colonies with nothing to do but wait for death-or for a cure to be found. In search of that cure, was an incredibly talented Hawaiian chemist who was studying the properties of the oil extracted from the chaulmoogra tree. This oil had been used in many Chinese herbal cures and a couple of times on lepers which the results would always differ. Alice's question was why didn't it always work every time. Alice teamed up with a surgeon from a hospital to try and find the answer to that question. She developed a way to separate the active elements of the chaulmoogra oil and created a new extract that could be injected directly into the patients bloodstream-with incredible results. Unfortunately, Alice died before she was able to publish her findings so the University of Hawaii did it for her-without giving her any credit. Many years later, her contribution was recognised and now Hawaii even celebrate Alice Ball Day on February 29 every four years. Caroline Herschel Though she was only 1.2 metres tall, she made up for her small stature with her contribution to our understanding of space and the world beyond. Born in Germany, 1750, she was 22 the year she left to join her brother William, in the English city of Bath to train as a singer, but it was soon astronomy that took the focus of their lives. She worked as a assistant to William, recording his observations and helping him produce more accurate lenses to search the endless sky. Between them they were able to record around 2,500 new nebulae and star clusters. She then became an independent astronomer and was the first woman to discover a comet. In recognition of her work she was employed by King George III in 1787 as William's assistant making her become the first woman ever to be paid for scientific work. In total she discovered 14 new nebulas, eight comets and added 561 new stars to Flamsteeds Atlas. Caroline's contribution has been honoured many times, including a gold medal from the Royal Astronomical Society in 1838. She also has a comet, an asteroid, a crater on the moon and a space telescope named after her. Jane Goodall Attitudes towards wildlife and animal conservation has changed dramatically in recent years thanks to the research and dedication of scientists in the are of biology and zoology such as Chimpanzee lover, Jane Goodall. From childhood Jane yearned for a life among African wildlife away from the war-stricken England she was born into. As she was unable to afford going to university, Jane settled to the job of a secretary. When 23, she had saved up enough money to go to Kenya where she met renowned anthropologist and palaeontologist Dr Louis S B Leakey. Leakey impressed and amazed with Jane's enthusiasm and knowledge, embarked alongside her on an investigation of wild chimpanzees in Gombe at a time where the concept of a young woman cohabiting with wild and unknown African animals was preposterous.