Featured
From: St Osmunds
Wa Lone, 33, and Kywan Soe Oo, 29, both award-winning journalists, have been released from a jail on the outskirts of Yangon, Myanmar in May after a sentence from the Official Secrets Agency in September 2017. The pair were released early, due to the amount of public protests and accusations about the country's reason for the supposedly "unjust" sentence. They spent over 500 days in prison. The pair was originally accused of "violating the country's Official Secrets Act" and were sentenced to nine years in jail. However, their imprisonment was seen as an "assault on press freedom" and many started questioning Myanmar's democracy. As the pair departed from the prison, Wa Lone vowed to continue his reporting and said that he was excited to return to work at the international news agency. "I am really happy and excited to see my family and colleagues again. I can't wait to go to my newsroom," he told reporters. Both journalists have families with young children. Wa Lone's wife only discovered that she was pregnant days after her husband's arrest. Wa Lone has only seen his daughter a few times on her visits to prison. Reuters' editor-in-chief said the reporters - who last month won the Pulitzer Prize for their work - had become "symbols" of press freedom. "We are enormously pleased Myanmar has released our courageous reporters," Stephen J Adler said. The journalist's case has been widely seen as a test of press freedom in Myanmar and the former political prisoner,  Aung San Su Kyi, has been ridiculed for defending the jailing of both journalists. Both men's families are over - joyed to have them home and despite some of their fears about the pair continuing reporting, they told the BBC that they are never going to stop supporting their newly - returned family members. More than 250 journalists are behind bars across the world, because of restrictions on freedom of expression and freedom of press. Turkey, for the second year running,  has been named the worst jailer with 68 journalists imprisoned. China came second with 47 while Egypt came third with 25. It is the journalist's role to tell the truth of what is happening to the world - and by exposing that truth, to hold power to account. But what if the risks of imprisonment (or worse) become too high?  
From: Barnes
Judith Kerr, the author and illustrator whose original story The Tiger Who Came to Tea introduced generations of pre-school children to reading and  enjoying books, has died at home at the age of 95. Her publisher said she'd had a short illness. Kerr, who dreamed up the tiger to amuse her two children, only started publishing in her 40s, and lived to see the book reach its millionth sale as she turned 94. Over a 50-year career she published more than 30 further books, immortalising a succession of family cats through the naughty but lovable Mog, and bringing to life her family’s flight across Europe as the Nazis came to power in the novel When Hitler Stole Pink Rabbit. 
From: Barnes
On the 7th of February, this year, a rover that will land on Mars, was named after historic scientist Rosalind Franklin. The rover is an a unmanned ship that will look deeper into life on Mars. The European Space Agency (ESA) has named it after her for the fascinating research that she did on the human body. Rosalind Franklin was born on the 25th of July, 1920, in Notting Hill, in London. From a young age, she knew she wanted to be a scientist. Her father discouraged the idea as in that time, it wasn't acceptable for a woman to have that type of career. She was extremely intelligent and went to study at St Paul's Girls school and the University of Cambridge (where she earned a Ph.D in physical chemistry). Her research and the work of James Watson and Francis Crick, led to the discovery of the DNA double helix. Because of this, she has become extremely famous, therefore having a rover named after her in her honour. The Exomars will be an incredible rover which will be searching for any signs, or hope, of life on Mars. The Rosalind Franklin will be different to any other rover before as it will be able to combine the capability to roam around the red planet as well as study beneath the surface. Hopefully it will find a droplet of water or some bacteria that will show that we are able to survive on Mars. British engineers are hoping to have the finished rover ready by July. This is an amazing breakthrough with both engineering and science.        
From: Barnes
Down in the sewers of Denmark a medieval sword has been dug out from the sewer's mud. The sword was from the 1300s and still seems to be awfully sharp and in super condition. The sword was covered in human waste and no one is really sure how it got there. Archaeologists think that the sword belonged to a magnificent warrior, from the 1300s. At the time, the swords were really expensive so only people from a royal family could afford to have one. It is going to be displayed in the Nordjyllands history museum in Aalborg, Denmark. The sword weighed about 2 pounds, and the sword was pushed and shoved so deeply in the sewers' mud that it was not noticed till now.