Featured
From: St Osmunds
On the 26th September, a beluga whale drifted up from the Arctic and was found swimming in the river Thames, in Gravesend near Kent. It's the most southerly sighting of a beluga ever.  Rescue teams from the Port of London Authority (or PLA) are on permanent standby in case the whale, who seems to have lost its way 1500 miles from its natural habitat, gets into any danger. Martin Garside of the PLA  said there had been many discussions about rescuing the beluga and ferrying it out to sea, but it would be a very distressing task for the animal. He said it would preferable if it could make its way out to the ocean naturally. Mr Garside also warned: “the many onlookers who circle around in boats, fly drones over the whale’s head and gather in droves along the river banks should leave it in peace”. This is not the first time a whale has swam up the Thames. In 2006, 2013 and 2016, whales have been washed up into the river but none of them were a beluga. Belugas are the smallest of all whales. They look like large dolphins, reaching 4 metres in length. They are easily recognized by the white colour of their skin and bulbous foreheads (called "melons"). They are also known as ‘the Canaries of the Seas” because of their very distinctive voices. There is a natural concern about plastic pollution levels in the Thames. Would the beluga eat well, and would it survive? New reports from the 6th October suggest it is ‘foraging normally’ and Martin Garside stated that: ''This whale has stayed in the same spot for more or less six days, which is a relief. Other whales have been in a hurry to get back but this whale has got comfortable.” Most of the whale’s movements are being tracked by experts of the PLA from a boat moored to a barge which causes minimum stress to the whale. It has now been nicknamed Benny the Beluga. As this article is published, Benny appears to be in no hurry to leave the river and return to the sea and experts warn he could stay there for months. If it still here by spring, and the Thames warms up, Benny could be airlifted from the Thames and flown 1,150 miles to Iceland in an extraordinary "Free Willy-style" rescue mission. We will of course keep you posted. In the meanwhile, we wish Benny good luck and to stay safe! By: Elise, Eve and Florence  
From: Barnes
A British man has died after being bitten by a sea snake on a fishing trawler in Australia, police have said: The man, 23, had just pulled up a net off the coast of the Northern Territory when he was bitten. Emergency crews were called to the boat, near the island Groote Eylandt, but were unable to save the man. It may be the first recorded death from a sea snake in Australia, but authorities have not said which species may have caused the death. Sea snakes are highly venomous, but because of their limited contact with humans, bites are relatively rare Australia is home to 30 of 70 known species, according to the Australian Institute of Marine Science. According to research published last year, snakes were responsible for 27 deaths in Australia between 2000 and 2013.
From: Barnes
Checking into your Social media accounts could be a daily occurrence for you, or perhaps it is something you do morning, noon and night, or even every hour. Everybody uses social media in different ways but how do you know if you’re using it too much? How to know when your using Social Media too much Keeping up to date on what your friends are doing can be a useful advantage of social media, if done in moderation. If you find yourself trawling through your friends' friends and vague acquaintances' profiles then you're going too far. You don't need to know so much about a person’s life and it will distract you from concentrating on your own life. Facebook are Taking in your Personal Details Did you know that Facebook are taking in your personal details? No. You probably didn't. Facebook are taking in everyone's personal details to remind people that photos are a type of personal details Strangers are on Social Media too If a stranger in a street approached you asking for your name, age, phone number, names of family, friends and interests you, you'd probably be hesitant to give up that information. You give all that information to everyone you are sharing your profile with. All of those facts about you are not owned by you. Everyone needs to take care with things like this. Social Media cut down Teenagers might be hit by time limits soon on social media apps. Matt Hancock, the Government minister for Social Media, has suggested that the companies behind these sites need to do more to help children stay safe online. This is what he stated ''I think there is a genuine concern about the amount of screen time young people are clocking up and the negative impact it could have on their lives.'' About Social Media and who's allowed on it Here are some examples of Social Media: Facebook , Instagram, Twitter , WhatsApp and Oovoo . Facebook, Instagram, WhatsApp, Twitter and Oovoo all have an age restriction of 13 years . The message    What I am trying to say is that everybody needs to stay safe when online. Also, I'm trying to say that some people are spending far too long on Social Media instead of having fun else where. Everyone needs to stay safe online.
From: St Osmunds
This week sees the launch of the "Wild Immersion" films. The Wild Immersion is a virtual reality entertainment production company which makes incredible films about wild natural environments. The audience is placed in 360° experiences through virtual reality (VR) headsets and immersive places, as if they were transported into the action. The Wild Immersion hopes to become the main producer of virtual reality movies about true experiences anywhere and is funded by the Jane Goodall institute who wants these films to transpose people (who would never be able to travel) on a safari to the wildest places and then make them care deeply for the environment.  Jane Goodall, who turned 84 this year is the one person who has completely shaped the way I look at nature. She is the conservationist that inspires me the most because of the amazing research she carried out in Tanzania on chimpanzees and the way she has always campaigned for a better understanding of their world and ours. She loved to see the similarities and differences between chimps and humans' behaviour. She did not have a Science degree from any university but proved that you can become anything you want by hard work and determination. Jane grew up in London, England and deeply loved animals even as a child.  When she was one her dad gave a chimp stuffed toy - her parents' friends said that it would scare her and give her nightmares - but in fact it became her favourite animal. At the age of five she went to a farm to look at the hen house and was fascinated with the chicken's eggs. Where did they come from? She always wanted to know things and always asked questions to find out more. When she became older she became a secretary and worked a bit in the film-making world but none of these were the things she aspired to be. 1956 is the year her life changed. A friend of hers invited her to their family's farm in Kenya, and there she met the amazing palaeontologist Louis Leakey who gave her the opportunity to go travel to Tanzania to study a group of chimpanzees. On July 14, 1960, Jane Goodall began setting up her camp at Gombe Stream National Park in Tanzania and made some astonishing discoveries about chimps and wrote many articles that gained international respect. Leakey later arranged for Jane to earn her Ph.D. in ethology (that's the science of animal behaviour) from Cambridge University. She was one of only eight people ever to have a doctoral dissertation accepted by Cambridge without first having an undergraduate degree. She has never stopped working since and is still travelling all over the world to make sure we understand how to best treat our environment and protect every creature that shares our planet.The numbers are chilling: 16,000 species are in danger of extinction, including a quarter of all mammals and one in five plant species. Her Wild Immersion series promises to be amazing and we can hope it will transform how everyone sees the world. As Jane Goodall said so well: "Every individual matters. Every individual has a role to play. Every individual makes a difference. Only if we understand, will we care. Only if we care, will we help. Only if we help shall all be saved. The least I can do is speak out for those who cannot speak for themselves". By : Isla