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From: St Osmunds
Wa Lone, 33, and Kywan Soe Oo, 29, both award-winning journalists, have been released from a jail on the outskirts of Yangon, Myanmar in May after a sentence from the Official Secrets Agency in September 2017. The pair were released early, due to the amount of public protests and accusations about the country's reason for the supposedly "unjust" sentence. They spent over 500 days in prison. The pair was originally accused of "violating the country's Official Secrets Act" and were sentenced to nine years in jail. However, their imprisonment was seen as an "assault on press freedom" and many started questioning Myanmar's democracy. As the pair departed from the prison, Wa Lone vowed to continue his reporting and said that he was excited to return to work at the international news agency. "I am really happy and excited to see my family and colleagues again. I can't wait to go to my newsroom," he told reporters. Both journalists have families with young children. Wa Lone's wife only discovered that she was pregnant days after her husband's arrest. Wa Lone has only seen his daughter a few times on her visits to prison. Reuters' editor-in-chief said the reporters - who last month won the Pulitzer Prize for their work - had become "symbols" of press freedom. "We are enormously pleased Myanmar has released our courageous reporters," Stephen J Adler said. The journalist's case has been widely seen as a test of press freedom in Myanmar and the former political prisoner,  Aung San Su Kyi, has been ridiculed for defending the jailing of both journalists. Both men's families are over - joyed to have them home and despite some of their fears about the pair continuing reporting, they told the BBC that they are never going to stop supporting their newly - returned family members. More than 250 journalists are behind bars across the world, because of restrictions on freedom of expression and freedom of press. Turkey, for the second year running,  has been named the worst jailer with 68 journalists imprisoned. China came second with 47 while Egypt came third with 25. It is the journalist's role to tell the truth of what is happening to the world - and by exposing that truth, to hold power to account. But what if the risks of imprisonment (or worse) become too high?  
From: Barnes
On the 7th of February, this year, a rover that will land on Mars, was named after historic scientist Rosalind Franklin. The rover is an a unmanned ship that will look deeper into life on Mars. The European Space Agency (ESA) has named it after her for the fascinating research that she did on the human body. Rosalind Franklin was born on the 25th of July, 1920, in Notting Hill, in London. From a young age, she knew she wanted to be a scientist. Her father discouraged the idea as in that time, it wasn't acceptable for a woman to have that type of career. She was extremely intelligent and went to study at St Paul's Girls school and the University of Cambridge (where she earned a Ph.D in physical chemistry). Her research and the work of James Watson and Francis Crick, led to the discovery of the DNA double helix. Because of this, she has become extremely famous, therefore having a rover named after her in her honour. The Exomars will be an incredible rover which will be searching for any signs, or hope, of life on Mars. The Rosalind Franklin will be different to any other rover before as it will be able to combine the capability to roam around the red planet as well as study beneath the surface. Hopefully it will find a droplet of water or some bacteria that will show that we are able to survive on Mars. British engineers are hoping to have the finished rover ready by July. This is an amazing breakthrough with both engineering and science.        
From: Barnes
The lake in Melbourne's Westgate Park (which is a man made lake) has naturally turned incredibly bright pink in the recent weeks.The lake has become a tourist attraction for all and has apparently become a hit on Instagram (great for getting likes).  Since 2013, the lake's environmental conditions have produced a red pigment called beto carotene which give the water a pink hue. The vivid color  is being produced by sunlight which causes warm temperatures and low rainfall. Tourists flock to the area and some visitors bizarrely dress up to help their photos to look better against the pink background.  
From: St Osmunds
Whilst most of us have been busy taking closeup selfies, scientists have been busy taking images of something 500 million trillion miles away; a black hole. This incredible phenomenon has been described by scientists as "a monster" because of its massive diameter of about 40 billion km (three times that of the Earth) and was photographed by a network of eight telescopes across the world. Profesor Heino Falcke, from Radboud University in the Netherlands, told BBC News that the black hole was found in a galaxy called M87. "What we see is larger than the size of our entire Solar System," he said. "It has a mass 6.5 billion times that of the Sun and it is one of the heaviest black holes that we think exists. It is an absolute monster, the heavyweight champion of black holes in the Universe." Surrounding the perfectly circular black hole is, in the words of Professor Falcke, "a ring of fire." The mesmerising halo was formed by superheated gas, falling into the hole. The white - hot flames are one million times brighter than all the stars in our galaxy combined, scientists told BBC News. A team of 200 scientists is now imaging another enormous black hole at the centre of our own galaxy, the Milky Way. Despite how it sounds, this is harder than getting an image from a distant galaxy 55 million light-years away. This is because, for some unknown reason, the "ring of fire" around the black hole at the heart of the Milky Way is smaller and dimmer; therefore harder to picture and harder to reach. I think I'll stick to taking selfies!