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From: St Osmunds
Wa Lone, 33, and Kywan Soe Oo, 29, both award-winning journalists, have been released from a jail on the outskirts of Yangon, Myanmar in May after a sentence from the Official Secrets Agency in September 2017. The pair were released early, due to the amount of public protests and accusations about the country's reason for the supposedly "unjust" sentence. They spent over 500 days in prison. The pair was originally accused of "violating the country's Official Secrets Act" and were sentenced to nine years in jail. However, their imprisonment was seen as an "assault on press freedom" and many started questioning Myanmar's democracy. As the pair departed from the prison, Wa Lone vowed to continue his reporting and said that he was excited to return to work at the international news agency. "I am really happy and excited to see my family and colleagues again. I can't wait to go to my newsroom," he told reporters. Both journalists have families with young children. Wa Lone's wife only discovered that she was pregnant days after her husband's arrest. Wa Lone has only seen his daughter a few times on her visits to prison. Reuters' editor-in-chief said the reporters - who last month won the Pulitzer Prize for their work - had become "symbols" of press freedom. "We are enormously pleased Myanmar has released our courageous reporters," Stephen J Adler said. The journalist's case has been widely seen as a test of press freedom in Myanmar and the former political prisoner,  Aung San Su Kyi, has been ridiculed for defending the jailing of both journalists. Both men's families are over - joyed to have them home and despite some of their fears about the pair continuing reporting, they told the BBC that they are never going to stop supporting their newly - returned family members. More than 250 journalists are behind bars across the world, because of restrictions on freedom of expression and freedom of press. Turkey, for the second year running,  has been named the worst jailer with 68 journalists imprisoned. China came second with 47 while Egypt came third with 25. It is the journalist's role to tell the truth of what is happening to the world - and by exposing that truth, to hold power to account. But what if the risks of imprisonment (or worse) become too high?  
From: Barnes
Judith Kerr, the author and illustrator whose original story The Tiger Who Came to Tea introduced generations of pre-school children to reading and  enjoying books, has died at home at the age of 95. Her publisher said she'd had a short illness. Kerr, who dreamed up the tiger to amuse her two children, only started publishing in her 40s, and lived to see the book reach its millionth sale as she turned 94. Over a 50-year career she published more than 30 further books, immortalising a succession of family cats through the naughty but lovable Mog, and bringing to life her family’s flight across Europe as the Nazis came to power in the novel When Hitler Stole Pink Rabbit. 
From: Barnes
On the 3rd of May, it was Word Press Freedom Day. Around the world, hundreds of journalists are imprisoned for writing stories. The highest number is in Turkey. Zehra Doğan, a Kurdish journalist and painter, was taken to court and sentenced to be in prison for nearly three years for doing artwork of the Turkish military forces destroying Nusaybin,Turkey. Luckily, her story gained worldwide attention in 2018 after others drew a mural calling for her release. In jail, Zehra secretly published a newspaper and created materials to paint. Now released, she is determined to continue sharing stories and drawing pictures. Doğan is an artist and journalist from Diyarbakir, Turkey. She is the founder and editor of Jinha, a unique Kurdish news site with a female-only staff. In a now deleted tweet, Doğan wrote, “I was given two years and 10 months in prison only because I painted Turkish flags on destroyed buildings. However, the Turkish government caused this. I only painted it.” She also wrote,“This painting was worth my time in prison because I managed to show the reality of  Nusaybin.” Since her release, lots of twitter users have shown their friendship accompanied by hashtags like #TurkeyCrackdown, #TerroristTurkey, and #FreeTurkeyMedia.
From: Barnes
The list of the richest people in the world has been published.  At the bottom of the list is Lee Shau Kee who is the co-founder of Sun Hung Kai, a successful property development company. He grew up in a very poor family, but today he is worth over $30 billion.  Next is Li Ka-Shing, who is one of the most influential businessmen in Asia and is the current chairman of CK Hutchison Holdings and CK Asset Holdings. However, he plans to step down from the position this year. As of March 2019, Li Ka-Shing’s net worth is roughly $32.7 billion. The American businessman, Sheldon Adelson, is the CEO of Las Vegas Sands Corporation and he is worth $35.4 billion. Although these people may sound rich, they are at the bottom of the list of the richest people. The richest person used to be Jeff Bezos - founder of Amazon - but now it is the famous Mark Zuckerberg, founder of Facebook.