Featured
From: St Osmunds
Wa Lone, 33, and Kywan Soe Oo, 29, both award-winning journalists, have been released from a jail on the outskirts of Yangon, Myanmar in May after a sentence from the Official Secrets Agency in September 2017. The pair were released early, due to the amount of public protests and accusations about the country's reason for the supposedly "unjust" sentence. They spent over 500 days in prison. The pair was originally accused of "violating the country's Official Secrets Act" and were sentenced to nine years in jail. However, their imprisonment was seen as an "assault on press freedom" and many started questioning Myanmar's democracy. As the pair departed from the prison, Wa Lone vowed to continue his reporting and said that he was excited to return to work at the international news agency. "I am really happy and excited to see my family and colleagues again. I can't wait to go to my newsroom," he told reporters. Both journalists have families with young children. Wa Lone's wife only discovered that she was pregnant days after her husband's arrest. Wa Lone has only seen his daughter a few times on her visits to prison. Reuters' editor-in-chief said the reporters - who last month won the Pulitzer Prize for their work - had become "symbols" of press freedom. "We are enormously pleased Myanmar has released our courageous reporters," Stephen J Adler said. The journalist's case has been widely seen as a test of press freedom in Myanmar and the former political prisoner,  Aung San Su Kyi, has been ridiculed for defending the jailing of both journalists. Both men's families are over - joyed to have them home and despite some of their fears about the pair continuing reporting, they told the BBC that they are never going to stop supporting their newly - returned family members. More than 250 journalists are behind bars across the world, because of restrictions on freedom of expression and freedom of press. Turkey, for the second year running,  has been named the worst jailer with 68 journalists imprisoned. China came second with 47 while Egypt came third with 25. It is the journalist's role to tell the truth of what is happening to the world - and by exposing that truth, to hold power to account. But what if the risks of imprisonment (or worse) become too high?  
From: Barnes
Judith Kerr, the author and illustrator whose original story The Tiger Who Came to Tea introduced generations of pre-school children to reading and  enjoying books, has died at home at the age of 95. Her publisher said she'd had a short illness. Kerr, who dreamed up the tiger to amuse her two children, only started publishing in her 40s, and lived to see the book reach its millionth sale as she turned 94. Over a 50-year career she published more than 30 further books, immortalising a succession of family cats through the naughty but lovable Mog, and bringing to life her family’s flight across Europe as the Nazis came to power in the novel When Hitler Stole Pink Rabbit. 
From: Barnes
The list of the richest people in the world has been published.  At the bottom of the list is Lee Shau Kee who is the co-founder of Sun Hung Kai, a successful property development company. He grew up in a very poor family, but today he is worth over $30 billion.  Next is Li Ka-Shing, who is one of the most influential businessmen in Asia and is the current chairman of CK Hutchison Holdings and CK Asset Holdings. However, he plans to step down from the position this year. As of March 2019, Li Ka-Shing’s net worth is roughly $32.7 billion. The American businessman, Sheldon Adelson, is the CEO of Las Vegas Sands Corporation and he is worth $35.4 billion. Although these people may sound rich, they are at the bottom of the list of the richest people. The richest person used to be Jeff Bezos - founder of Amazon - but now it is the famous Mark Zuckerberg, founder of Facebook.
From: St Osmunds
Every year we celebrate an International Day of Women and Girls in Science. This day, which falls on the 11th February, is a reminder that women and girls play a critical role in science and that their contribution needs to be celebrated. Here are a few women from the present and the past who have well and truly left their mark in the world of science. Alice Ball Long ago, there was no cure for leprosy, a disease that attacks the body and can leave victims terribly disfigured. Because there was no treatment and people believed leprosy was very contagious, sufferers used to isolated in leper colonies with nothing to do but wait for death-or for a cure to be found. In search of that cure, was an incredibly talented Hawaiian chemist who was studying the properties of the oil extracted from the chaulmoogra tree. This oil had been used in many Chinese herbal cures and a couple of times on lepers which the results would always differ. Alice's question was why didn't it always work every time. Alice teamed up with a surgeon from a hospital to try and find the answer to that question. She developed a way to separate the active elements of the chaulmoogra oil and created a new extract that could be injected directly into the patients bloodstream-with incredible results. Unfortunately, Alice died before she was able to publish her findings so the University of Hawaii did it for her-without giving her any credit. Many years later, her contribution was recognised and now Hawaii even celebrate Alice Ball Day on February 29 every four years. Caroline Herschel Though she was only 1.2 metres tall, she made up for her small stature with her contribution to our understanding of space and the world beyond. Born in Germany, 1750, she was 22 the year she left to join her brother William, in the English city of Bath to train as a singer, but it was soon astronomy that took the focus of their lives. She worked as a assistant to William, recording his observations and helping him produce more accurate lenses to search the endless sky. Between them they were able to record around 2,500 new nebulae and star clusters. She then became an independent astronomer and was the first woman to discover a comet. In recognition of her work she was employed by King George III in 1787 as William's assistant making her become the first woman ever to be paid for scientific work. In total she discovered 14 new nebulas, eight comets and added 561 new stars to Flamsteeds Atlas. Caroline's contribution has been honoured many times, including a gold medal from the Royal Astronomical Society in 1838. She also has a comet, an asteroid, a crater on the moon and a space telescope named after her. Jane Goodall Attitudes towards wildlife and animal conservation has changed dramatically in recent years thanks to the research and dedication of scientists in the are of biology and zoology such as Chimpanzee lover, Jane Goodall. From childhood Jane yearned for a life among African wildlife away from the war-stricken England she was born into. As she was unable to afford going to university, Jane settled to the job of a secretary. When 23, she had saved up enough money to go to Kenya where she met renowned anthropologist and palaeontologist Dr Louis S B Leakey. Leakey impressed and amazed with Jane's enthusiasm and knowledge, embarked alongside her on an investigation of wild chimpanzees in Gombe at a time where the concept of a young woman cohabiting with wild and unknown African animals was preposterous.