Featured
From: St Osmunds
On the 26th September, a beluga whale drifted up from the Arctic and was found swimming in the river Thames, in Gravesend near Kent. It's the most southerly sighting of a beluga ever.  Rescue teams from the Port of London Authority (or PLA) are on permanent standby in case the whale, who seems to have lost its way 1500 miles from its natural habitat, gets into any danger. Martin Garside of the PLA  said there had been many discussions about rescuing the beluga and ferrying it out to sea, but it would be a very distressing task for the animal. He said it would preferable if it could make its way out to the ocean naturally. Mr Garside also warned: “the many onlookers who circle around in boats, fly drones over the whale’s head and gather in droves along the river banks should leave it in peace”. This is not the first time a whale has swam up the Thames. In 2006, 2013 and 2016, whales have been washed up into the river but none of them were a beluga. Belugas are the smallest of all whales. They look like large dolphins, reaching 4 metres in length. They are easily recognized by the white colour of their skin and bulbous foreheads (called "melons"). They are also known as ‘the Canaries of the Seas” because of their very distinctive voices. There is a natural concern about plastic pollution levels in the Thames. Would the beluga eat well, and would it survive? New reports from the 6th October suggest it is ‘foraging normally’ and Martin Garside stated that: ''This whale has stayed in the same spot for more or less six days, which is a relief. Other whales have been in a hurry to get back but this whale has got comfortable.” Most of the whale’s movements are being tracked by experts of the PLA from a boat moored to a barge which causes minimum stress to the whale. It has now been nicknamed Benny the Beluga. As this article is published, Benny appears to be in no hurry to leave the river and return to the sea and experts warn he could stay there for months. If it still here by spring, and the Thames warms up, Benny could be airlifted from the Thames and flown 1,150 miles to Iceland in an extraordinary "Free Willy-style" rescue mission. We will of course keep you posted. In the meanwhile, we wish Benny good luck and to stay safe! By: Elise, Eve and Florence  
From: Barnes
A British man has died after being bitten by a sea snake on a fishing trawler in Australia, police have said: The man, 23, had just pulled up a net off the coast of the Northern Territory when he was bitten. Emergency crews were called to the boat, near the island Groote Eylandt, but were unable to save the man. It may be the first recorded death from a sea snake in Australia, but authorities have not said which species may have caused the death. Sea snakes are highly venomous, but because of their limited contact with humans, bites are relatively rare Australia is home to 30 of 70 known species, according to the Australian Institute of Marine Science. According to research published last year, snakes were responsible for 27 deaths in Australia between 2000 and 2013.
From: Barnes
Fortnite is an online video game first released in 2017 and developed by Epic Games. Unfortunately, it has come across as a bad game. It involves killing and is a 13 but many people under the age limit play it. The creator of Fortnite is Darren Sugg. He thought it would be a great idea to invent a killing game. At first it was a 10 but then parents argued that it was way too violent for 10-year-olds. It gave way to a 12 ,then a 13. Gaming statistics show that there are more than 40 million people logging in to play Fortnite every month. Considering the game launched in July of last year and the popular Battle Royale version launched in September 2017, the number of people playing Fortnite is remarkable.
From: Barnes
 Some of you may think that seals are either playful puppies or lions of the sea. Will in the case of this sassy seal you are mistaken. While a man was kayaking on the coast of Kaikoura on New Zealand's south island, a seal decided to slam an octopus onto his face. The man was on a trip with his friends when it happened.  His friend, Taiyo Masuda said it was a "beautiful day and seals were swimming and enjoying sun on the rocks. Right around lunchtime, several seals started to swim around. We just thought they were refreshing their body, yet apparently they were seeking more food. "One of the seals swam right next to us, having an octopus in his mouth, pops right up of the surface next to us, then tries to chew up the leg but ended up slapping our face! We instantly started laughing, certainly got surprised. We are all adventure guys but we don't encounter that every day! Such a raw moment, brought so much laughter to all of us all day long... What a day to remember!" The seal came up a couple of times before swimming away, probably to hit another innocent kayaker.