Featured
From: St Osmunds
180 children are currently held in the prisons of Madagascar accused of stealing vanilla. They are often held in appalling conditions for years without a proper trial. Many children around the world suffer a similar fate. In Madagascar, selling vanilla is a trading policy, it sells for at least $150 in exporting markets . Stealing vanilla is a highly common crime there. It is a big business for the African island, an expensive commodity and people will try to get hold of it and sell it to make some more money for their often very poor families. Children are suffering a great deal in Madagascar just for stealing something as small as vanilla. The prison conditions there are abysmal. All these children have are concrete beds without mattresses and all are confined to tiny cells, cramped together. They are prisoners alongside 2000 other adults, many of whom have committed really big crimes and the prisons are only meant to hold 280 prisoners. Some haven't seen their mums in years because their families are very poor and can't travel to the prison. A BBC investigation dated 1st October 2019, found out that many of these children can spend more than 3 years in prison for that theft without even a trial. And when they go to trial, most of them don't even get a lawyer to defend them. In prison, they are miserable, dirty and only get one meal a day and no-one to care for them when they fall ill. Those are only some of the many children being held in prisons across the globe, children in Iraq are being punished because of things their parents did , Palestinian children have been captured and are being put into Iran's prisons for doing nothing more than protesting against grown up politics.  Innocent children everywhere are suffering in terrible conditions, they only have each other to rely on. According to the latest figures from Human Rights Watch and the UN's Child Fund, UNICEF, an estimated 1 million children are behind bars around the world today. In my eyes, it's  wrong to send children to jail at such young ages, in such poor living spaces. Human wrights groups are protesting against this but people in power just won't listen ! By Zandile Photo Cred : Getty Images
From: Barnes
On the Samsung S10 anyone's fingerprint can unlock the phone. The phone was released in March 2019. Samsung promised to fix the software problem. The conundrum was noticed by a British woman whose husband managed to unlock her phone with his fingerprint when it was stored in a low quality case. At the time when the S10 was launched, in March, Samsung verified the fingerprint  system as "revolutionary". Though, it is more like revolutionarily bad! The British couple who discovered the security issue said it was a "real concern". Since buying a £2.70 gel screen protector on eBay, Lisa Neilson registered her right fingerprint and then found her left fingerprint, which was not registered, could also unlock the phone. It was found out on the 18 of October 2019. For some reason, the scanner on the phone sends ultrasounds to detect 3D ridges of  the user thumbprint to recognise the users finger. Samsung said they were aware of the case of S10's malfunctioning fingerprint recognition and will soon fix  the problem and  issue a software patch".  KaKao Bank told  S10 customers to switch off the fingerprint-recognition option to log in to its services until the issue was fixed.  
From: Barnes
Fatty tissue has been found in the lungs of overweight and obese people for the first time. Australian researchers analysed lung samples from 52 people and found the amount of fat increased in line with body mass index. They said their findings could explain why being overweight or obese increased asthma risk. Lung experts said it would be interesting to see if the effect could be reversed by weight loss. They found that it would only be possible if they lost 19kg in 2 days; around the loss of Tenzing Norgay in his voyage on mout Everest.
From: St Osmunds
In late September 2019, a tiny Fiordland penguin washed up on a beach in Victoria, 170 kilometres west of Melbourne, Australia. It had swam all the way from the South Island of New Zealand. Scientists found it struggling by some rocks well underweight. The penguin has now regained its species usual 3.5kg weight in his time at Melbourne Zoo. The Fiordland penguin swam 2500 kilometres before arriving in the shallows of Kennett River. To gain his muscles back, they released him into water, at first just a bathtub but gradually a swimming pool. This feat is unusual as penguins of his kind rarely leave the island by more than 150 kilometres. It is now ready to complete its 2500 kilometre journey home. Scientists have micro chipped him so that they can find out if it returns successfully. "We are hoping that this penguin will get home and breed." Dr Michael Lynch, a zoologist working at Melbourne Zoo, told the Guardian Newspaper. The scientists in charge of restoring his normal weight claimed that he ate 20 to 25 percent of his own bodyweight. After eight weeks, it will finally be released back into the wild. It has now been taken to Phillip Island National Parks to build up its muscle strength in larger pools. By : Charlie