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From: St Osmunds
Wa Lone, 33, and Kywan Soe Oo, 29, both award-winning journalists, have been released from a jail on the outskirts of Yangon, Myanmar in May after a sentence from the Official Secrets Agency in September 2017. The pair were released early, due to the amount of public protests and accusations about the country's reason for the supposedly "unjust" sentence. They spent over 500 days in prison. The pair was originally accused of "violating the country's Official Secrets Act" and were sentenced to nine years in jail. However, their imprisonment was seen as an "assault on press freedom" and many started questioning Myanmar's democracy. As the pair departed from the prison, Wa Lone vowed to continue his reporting and said that he was excited to return to work at the international news agency. "I am really happy and excited to see my family and colleagues again. I can't wait to go to my newsroom," he told reporters. Both journalists have families with young children. Wa Lone's wife only discovered that she was pregnant days after her husband's arrest. Wa Lone has only seen his daughter a few times on her visits to prison. Reuters' editor-in-chief said the reporters - who last month won the Pulitzer Prize for their work - had become "symbols" of press freedom. "We are enormously pleased Myanmar has released our courageous reporters," Stephen J Adler said. The journalist's case has been widely seen as a test of press freedom in Myanmar and the former political prisoner,  Aung San Su Kyi, has been ridiculed for defending the jailing of both journalists. Both men's families are over - joyed to have them home and despite some of their fears about the pair continuing reporting, they told the BBC that they are never going to stop supporting their newly - returned family members. More than 250 journalists are behind bars across the world, because of restrictions on freedom of expression and freedom of press. Turkey, for the second year running,  has been named the worst jailer with 68 journalists imprisoned. China came second with 47 while Egypt came third with 25. It is the journalist's role to tell the truth of what is happening to the world - and by exposing that truth, to hold power to account. But what if the risks of imprisonment (or worse) become too high?  
From: St Osmunds
After a difficult year for Britain, with so much news coverage devoted to Brexit, it was a nice relief to see some positive news in the form of the birth of Baby Sussex (who's now known as Archie). He is the son of Prince Harry and his wife Meghan, and was born at 5:26 on the 6th May in London's Portland Hospital. His full name is Archie Harrison Mountbatten - Windsor. The couple shared the news on Instagram with an image of Queen Elizabeth and Megan's mother Doria Ragland, meeting their newest great - grandson. BBC royal correspondent Jonny Dymond said there was a "strong indication" that Archie won't be brought up as a formal 'royal'. Harry and Meghan Markle have made it very clear  that they plan to break tradition and raise their son away from the spotlight, so as to give him the most ‘normal’ upbringing possible, possibly even in South Africa, where Harry's uncle, the Earl of Spencer, lives.  
From: St Osmunds
Whilst most of us have been busy taking closeup selfies, scientists have been busy taking images of something 500 million trillion miles away; a black hole. This incredible phenomenon has been described by scientists as "a monster" because of its massive diameter of about 40 billion km (three times that of the Earth) and was photographed by a network of eight telescopes across the world. Profesor Heino Falcke, from Radboud University in the Netherlands, told BBC News that the black hole was found in a galaxy called M87. "What we see is larger than the size of our entire Solar System," he said. "It has a mass 6.5 billion times that of the Sun and it is one of the heaviest black holes that we think exists. It is an absolute monster, the heavyweight champion of black holes in the Universe." Surrounding the perfectly circular black hole is, in the words of Professor Falcke, "a ring of fire." The mesmerising halo was formed by superheated gas, falling into the hole. The white - hot flames are one million times brighter than all the stars in our galaxy combined, scientists told BBC News. A team of 200 scientists is now imaging another enormous black hole at the centre of our own galaxy, the Milky Way. Despite how it sounds, this is harder than getting an image from a distant galaxy 55 million light-years away. This is because, for some unknown reason, the "ring of fire" around the black hole at the heart of the Milky Way is smaller and dimmer; therefore harder to picture and harder to reach. I think I'll stick to taking selfies!
From: Barnes
On Monday 18 March, Barnes Primary had the privilege of having our local MP Zac Goldsmith coming to visit. Zac gave us a little speech on climate change and how it will effect the whole wide world. He also told us that a few years ago all the politicians in the world met in Paris to discuss climate change and to stop the world from reaching 2 degrees hotter but now they want to make sure the world doesn't reach 1.5 degrees. The only problem is that all the politicians don't care about reaching 1.5 degrees, any more only 2 degrees. When he was done we were allowed to ask questions and this is what Jack Fernie asked Zac: "Zac, which do you think is more important Brexit or climate change?". Zac replied: "There is no doubt in my mind that climate change is more important than Brexit".