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From: St Osmunds
Wa Lone, 33, and Kywan Soe Oo, 29, both award-winning journalists, have been released from a jail on the outskirts of Yangon, Myanmar in May after a sentence from the Official Secrets Agency in September 2017. The pair were released early, due to the amount of public protests and accusations about the country's reason for the supposedly "unjust" sentence. They spent over 500 days in prison. The pair was originally accused of "violating the country's Official Secrets Act" and were sentenced to nine years in jail. However, their imprisonment was seen as an "assault on press freedom" and many started questioning Myanmar's democracy. As the pair departed from the prison, Wa Lone vowed to continue his reporting and said that he was excited to return to work at the international news agency. "I am really happy and excited to see my family and colleagues again. I can't wait to go to my newsroom," he told reporters. Both journalists have families with young children. Wa Lone's wife only discovered that she was pregnant days after her husband's arrest. Wa Lone has only seen his daughter a few times on her visits to prison. Reuters' editor-in-chief said the reporters - who last month won the Pulitzer Prize for their work - had become "symbols" of press freedom. "We are enormously pleased Myanmar has released our courageous reporters," Stephen J Adler said. The journalist's case has been widely seen as a test of press freedom in Myanmar and the former political prisoner,  Aung San Su Kyi, has been ridiculed for defending the jailing of both journalists. Both men's families are over - joyed to have them home and despite some of their fears about the pair continuing reporting, they told the BBC that they are never going to stop supporting their newly - returned family members. More than 250 journalists are behind bars across the world, because of restrictions on freedom of expression and freedom of press. Turkey, for the second year running,  has been named the worst jailer with 68 journalists imprisoned. China came second with 47 while Egypt came third with 25. It is the journalist's role to tell the truth of what is happening to the world - and by exposing that truth, to hold power to account. But what if the risks of imprisonment (or worse) become too high?  
From: Barnes
On the 7th of February, this year, a rover that will land on Mars, was named after historic scientist Rosalind Franklin. The rover is an a unmanned ship that will look deeper into life on Mars. The European Space Agency (ESA) has named it after her for the fascinating research that she did on the human body. Rosalind Franklin was born on the 25th of July, 1920, in Notting Hill, in London. From a young age, she knew she wanted to be a scientist. Her father discouraged the idea as in that time, it wasn't acceptable for a woman to have that type of career. She was extremely intelligent and went to study at St Paul's Girls school and the University of Cambridge (where she earned a Ph.D in physical chemistry). Her research and the work of James Watson and Francis Crick, led to the discovery of the DNA double helix. Because of this, she has become extremely famous, therefore having a rover named after her in her honour. The Exomars will be an incredible rover which will be searching for any signs, or hope, of life on Mars. The Rosalind Franklin will be different to any other rover before as it will be able to combine the capability to roam around the red planet as well as study beneath the surface. Hopefully it will find a droplet of water or some bacteria that will show that we are able to survive on Mars. British engineers are hoping to have the finished rover ready by July. This is an amazing breakthrough with both engineering and science.        
From: Barnes
The lake in Melbourne's Westgate Park (which is a man made lake) has naturally turned incredibly bright pink in the recent weeks.The lake has become a tourist attraction for all and has apparently become a hit on Instagram (great for getting likes).  Since 2013, the lake's environmental conditions have produced a red pigment called beto carotene which give the water a pink hue. The vivid color  is being produced by sunlight which causes warm temperatures and low rainfall. Tourists flock to the area and some visitors bizarrely dress up to help their photos to look better against the pink background.  
From: Barnes
A startling discovery of yet another dead grey whale on San Francisco Bay’s Ocean Beach was made May 6th, 2019. This is the ninth grey whale to wash up dead on these shores since March 2019. This particular whale is thought to have been killed by an impact with a ship, however, also showed signs of malnutrition. Examinations carried out by the The Marine Mammal Center show that four of the other whales were killed by an impact with ships, three by malnutrition and one by causes yet determined. It was also noted that it is usual for 1-3 whales to be found dead in this area during the entire migration season which puts the current count at three times the normal rate. Grey whales normally migrate through the San Francisco area twice yearly in Decembers/January and again in April/May. The whales are travelling from their feeding ground in Alaska to their breeding ground in Baja, California which is 11 000 miles away. Scientists are speculating that the grey whales  are having trouble finding food in Alaska and as a result do not have enough nourishment to make the long journey to Baja. Scientists have also observed the whales feeding in San Francisco waters,  giving birth in the open ocean prior to arriving at their breeding ground and as a result arriving later in Baja, all of which are highly unusual activity for these mammals. It appears that the death of the whales were caused by human activity either by direct impact with ships  or indirectly by climate change. Although grey whale populations are currently stable, marine scientists are fearful that this might not be the case for long.